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Can Someone Oppose Your Expunction?

Can Someone Oppose Your Expunction?

Expunction
If you meet the requirements for an expunction set out by Texas law, you might assume that the court will grant your petition with few obstacles. However, it is important to recognize that there are complications that might arise during an expunction case - including that certain parties might file objections with the court. You want a Texas expunction lawyer who knows how to represent your rights in the face of such objections. Who Can Object? Agencies that hold the records that would be destroyed can oppose destruction, and this often includes law enforcement agencies and prosecuting offices. Often, they oppose an expunction because they might need to access your records for other purposes, such as using the records for an ongoing or current investigation. Consider the following situations: You…
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Expunctions: Does it Matter Why Your Charges were Dismissed?

Expunctions: Does it Matter Why Your Charges were Dismissed?

Expunction
Once a prosecutor or judge announces that your charges are dismissed in a criminal case, you likely breathe a huge sigh of relief that you will not have a conviction on your record. However, even having dismissed charges on your record can impact your job and other opportunities. To get rid of the stigma of criminal allegations, you might want to pursue an expunction of your record. Expunctions are available for some people who have had their criminal charges dismissed - but not all. The reason why your charges were dismissed does matter - specifically because dismissals after serving community supervision do not qualify for expunction. Deferred Adjudication In some criminal cases, a judge will delay entering judgment on a case until after you serve community supervision. If you complete…
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Should You Have Your Record Sealed?

Should You Have Your Record Sealed?

Non-disclosure
Being convicted of a crime can change your life. Not only might the court order you to pay fines and serve probation, but you will then have the conviction appear on your criminal record - possibly for the rest of your life. Even if the judge dismissed your charges after deferred adjudication, your record can still harm your reputation, career, and more. If you had deferred adjudication or a conviction in your criminal case, you are generally not eligible for an expunction in Texas, which destroys the records. However, this does not mean you must live with the consequences of your mistakes forever. Instead, learn about your eligibility for non-disclosure, which does not destroy anything, but can effectively seal your record. Benefits of Non-Disclosure You probably did not realize the…
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